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Entry: Wednesday, May 27, 1953
Title: De Lijnbaan
Submitted by:
Jaap Bakema Study Centre
Country:
The Netherlands
Category:
Public space
The Lijnbaan opened in 1953, as the main pedestrian street in the new shopping district. It was a highly symbolical project of hope and progress, the epitome of the new, reconstructed Rotterdam after the old city centre was completely destroyed during the bombing of Rotterdam by the German Luftwaffe in May 1940. It combined the universalism of the welfare state with the new consumer culture of the post-war decades. Within CIAM circles it became a model for the idea of 'core', or the heart of the city, the 1951 theme of the CIAM congress in Hoddesdon, UK. The project was planned by the firm of Van den Broek en Bakema in close cooperation with the various shop owners and the city department of planning. To accommodate the demands of the individual shop owners a basic typology of shops was developed with a catalogue of different spatial configurations including voids and shop windows. To create a comprehensive streetscape, a rigorous facade system was developed of repetitive, concrete elements together with a continous canopy, with which all individual shops had to comply. Other street elements included kiosks, telephone booths, benches, art pieces and greenery. The highrise slabs of appartments were designed by among others Hugh Maaskant.
Comments: [46,964]
Entry: Sunday, May 28, 1972
Submitted by:
Jaap Bakema Study Centre
Country:
The Netherlands
Category:
Public space
Bakema and his office Van den Broek en Bakema designed the new town hall of Terneuzen as a meeting point. It is situated between the old city and the new districts and it sits against the dyke overlooking the sea and the Westerschelde estuary. Because of its bold and sculptural concrete architecture it acts as a point of orientation for the citizens of Terneuzen while connecting the various elements of the larger environment (old and new, sea and land, government, administration and community). The architecture is reminiscent of infrastructural engineering works that serve and protect, rather than the representation of authority. The spatial lay-out of the building is like an upward going spiral; by way of a split-level system public and ceremonial spaces are connected with the offices of the administration. Bakema calls the building an 'open structure', because of the interrelationships between the building as a democratic representation of the city and the larger community and because of the concrete structure that opens up at the top of the building awaiting future appropriation.
Comments: [0]